Making it happen since 1988

On being single minded.

By Adam Reynolds on Nov 17, 2015

People see things in different ways. Let’s take a group of 10 ordinary folks and get them to witness a crime. Now they all saw the same thing, but they’ll have the police looking for a tall short blonde with dark hair, one leg, a humpback, a lisp and a limp.

It’s called the Rashomon Effect, named after the 1950 Japanese film, Rashomon. It describes contradictory interpretations of the same event by different people.

Now let’s get that same group to watch an advert. While they’re watching, they’re probably scrolling through their Twitter feed on their phone, wondering what to have for tea and ignoring the window cleaner who’s knocking on the door for his £5.70.

If that ad tries to tell them more than one thing about the product, how many do you think they’ll remember? And depending on the clarity of the message, will they remember what you want them to?

The more we say in marketing, the less people listen. Decide what the single most important thing is you want people to take from your ad. Then tell them in a way that no one else does.

Don’t try to say everything all at once. Don’t leave yourself open to contradictory interpretations. Don’t end up being a tall short blonde with dark hair, one leg, a humpback, a lisp and a limp.

Be simple. Be clear. Be single minded.